March 19th 2003
This wonderful place
was photographed
in Hilo, Hawaii
bt Reggie and Joed..
High resolution files are available
for free to schools.

all photos copyrighted
PRIMAL PHOTOGRAPHS
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ONOMEABAY

AHHHH HEAVEN BY THE SEA!!
A wonderful day in the jungles
of Hawaii. Unvisited waterfalls,
streams clear and fresh,
prawns swimming nearby,
a massage by Pele,
leaping from wooden bridges
This is Onomea, enjoy!




This "garden in a valley on the ocean" is,
located off of Highway 19 on the lush
Hamakua Coast, 8 1/2 miles north of Hilo
in the sheltered Onomea Valley
on the Big Island of Hawaii.
. In Hawaii, onomea means
"the best place."
And indeed, no better place exists.




The Shaping of Onomea Bay
Over the millennia, erosion has
been one of the primary forces
shaping Onomea Bay.
Onomea and Alakahi streams
have carved the valley, while winds
and waves have cut the lava cliffs.
Earthquakes and tsunamis have rocked
the coast, causing radical
changes in the face of the landscape.
The most notable work of the elements
was Onomea Arch, carved from
the cliffs by restless waterpower. Legend
has it that King Kamehameha threw
his spear to create this huge tunnel in the rock.




Onomea Arch fell during an earthquake
in 1956 after standing for thousands of years.
Today the fallen arch appears as a wide
crevice in the cliff on the north side
of Onomea Bay, but this favorite Hilo
landmark is preserved in antique postcards
which recall its glory from the turn of the century.




Long ago, Onomea Bay was a fishing
village for the early Hawaiians. Old stone
walls in the Garden today were created
by early settlers to make terraces for
growing taro and sugar cane.
These stone walls kept the
land on the slope from eroding into the stream.




Onomea Bay served as one of the
Big Island's first natural landing
areas for sailing ships. In the early 1800s
the fishing village, known as Kahali'i,
became a shipping port, first importing
materials to construct the Onomea Sugar Mill
and then exporting raw sugar.
The settlers were a mixture of Portuguese,
Chinese, Japanese, and Filipinos who
came here to work in the sugar
cane fields and build the Onomea Sugar Mill.






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